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Daz Gray

Daz Gray
 
Darryl Gray has been writing songs ever since he was forced to learn guitar at school and has amassed an impressive stockpile of songs that nobody has ever heard. He performs solo and with The Good Ship and spent the late 90’s/early 00’s writing and performing in The Neurotransmitters. His love of the three minute pop song was cemented with a childhood spent listening to classic hits radio stations absorbing the best of the 50’s, 60’s, 70’s and 80’s and he brings a touch of that classicism to everything he writes.
 
The Good Ship allows him to explore country, folk and rock with dark and sometimes confrontational lyrics and themes whilst being firmly rooted in the traditions of bluegrass, Irish jigs, Americana and Eastern European traditional music.
 
His solo work is largely acoustic based storytelling songs that mix humour and pathos, often exploring his own life with brutal honesty. He is vaguely proud of the fact that he hasn’t written a love song.
 
The Neurotransmitters mixed indie sensibilities with epic soundscapes and throughout their eight years together released only one EP with an unreleased album in the can. They supported such bands as The Panics, Gersey and The Raveonettes.
 
Some comments about The Neurotransmitters and The Good Ship.
 
'At times the vocals smack of Michael Stipe plaintiveness and the song structuring confirms these guys have been reared on thinking man's rock.'
 
‘Local indie pop rockers The Neurotransmitters have flooded this their debut EP with melodic swells of ludicrously catchy and uplifting music exemplifying depth in frontman Darryl Gray’s songwriting.’
 
‘The Good Ship flow effortlessly through Celtic/Irish folk to classical Spanish to country and back again in the space of a couple of tracks. What The Good Ship have done is create a unique sounding album, full of good songs that make it hard to not tap a foot too or bop your head along too. There’s a dark underlying humour that makes this a enjoyable listen.’