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Singer / Songwriters

Artist
Talk to people about Sara Storer and the same words keep being used: ‘real’, ‘unaffected’, ‘authentic’. It’s partly a way of acknowledging that she’s lived the life she sings about – growing up on a farm in Victoria’s Mallee, her grandfather a pioneer of the district, then teaching in tiny bush towns in Queensland and the Northern Territory.But authenticity alone doesn’t make a great artist. Sara has a hungry writer’s eye, her songs full of vivid, telling moments and narratives that seem to drop the listener into a freshly minted world. The voice that tells these tales is open and unguarded; the music seductive yet energised. Her songs speak with great directness and immediacy, as if we had found ourselves on the road, or round the campfire, with the characters of the song.Some songwriters take their inspirations from other songs; with Sara, the starting point is more often a scene torn directly from life. Her first song, ‘Buffallo Bill’, is typical: the story drawn from a retired buffalo shooter she met when working in a truck stop in the small Queensland town of Camooweal. She gave him the song as you would a gift, saw the tears it brought forth from the old man, and started to understand the power of song.Soon she moved to the Territory, teaching in Kalkaringi, an Aboriginal settlement 500km south west of Katherine. There she developed her songwriting and began to play for friends – at parties and around campfires. A friend encouraged her to enter a talent quest at the town of Adelaide River, a dot in the red dirt of the far north. The ‘encouragement prize’ was a workshop at the Australian College of Country Music, held in the weeks leading up to the Tamworth Country Music Festival.Sara took the two-week course in January 2000. Just four years later, she was back at the same festival – and won more awards in a single festival than anyone before or since: seven Golden Guitars.She’d been busy, of course, during those intervening four years. When she first went to Tamworth, with her ticket from Adelaide River, she met the record producer Garth Porter. Garth recorded six of her songs and introduced her to ABC Music, who quickly signed the young artist. Her first album, Chasing Buffalo, came out later that year, producing three number one singles on the country charts – starting with ‘Buffalo Bill’.Sara won the Best New Talent award at the 2001 Country Music Awards, and then – in 2002 – released her second album Beautiful Circle, this time with the stand-out song ‘Raining on the Plain’, a duet with John Williamson. By 2004, with that record haul of Golden Guitars, there was no stopping her. Two more acclaimed albums followed – Firefly (2005) and Silver Skies (2007) – and now the one you hold in your hands.Paul Kelly, Australia’s master-songwriter, may have best captured her unique talent: ‘You know she’s paid attention,’ he says, ‘heard the bush waking up in the morning, listened to the worries thrashed out at the kitchen table, smelt dry summer wheat up close, dreamed of far away places in a bedroom with a window on a big sky, driven miles on dirt and bitumen and fallen in and out of love. She’s found her own way to sing the stories that are all around her and then inside her bubbling out. She doesn’t copy over-emotive, fake sincere twangy country singers from overseas. She’s found her own restraint and steel and lets her songs do their sweet, sly work.’Let the sweet, sly work begin; press ‘play’ on Calling Me Home and let Sara Storer tell you a tale. http://www.sarastorer.com.au/https://www.facebook.com/sarastorermusic?fref=tshttps://twitter.com/SaraStorer 

Storer began her recording career with ABC Music, releasing the Gold selling album Chasing Buffalo (2000) followed by

Artist
To the discerning listener from Andrew Morris:Welcome to my new album ‘Shadow of a Shadow’. The album has taken me a little over a year to put together, given birth with the working title of ‘Mountain Songs’. This title was relevant as I was living up in Mount Nebo, a small village perched atop of Brisbane’s North Western edge. With views from my cottage over Moreton Bay and the canopies of trees below, I set out to make a stripped back folk record, inspired, dare I say by a ‘mountain muse’. It didn’t take me long however to scrap any preconception of an album theme, and I went to work with the bare guide of ‘whatever works best’; the best song stays. A collection of around twenty songs was whittled down to the final thirteen you hear here. Most were written post-Needs & Wants, although two tracks (‘Exils’ and ‘Mother/Brother’) were salvaged from the piano writing sessions of that album. Being alone in the mountains allowed me plenty of time to mull over the themes and subjects of the songs. I’ll leave the interpretation up to your discretion – needless to say a good deal of introspection and navel gazing went on up on that mountain!So for the actual recording process: Over the last two years I’d managed to scrape together a decent home studio set up, so decided that was the best way to record in the comfort of my own home, with only the trees to bear witness. Sure this album could have been recorded in a slick studio but I decided to do it at home with the King Parrots, and to be honest that’s the way I like it. Too often a magic demo take goes astray and with this method I was able to keep the nuggets in the sieve.The temptation to record all parts myself in a true megalomaniac style was overridden mainly by the aim to make the album vary in sound, not just one guy in a room hogging all the ideas. And there were too many talented friends I could entice up to the hilltop with the promise of a bowl of minestrone soup or a slow cooked lamb shank. These friends made invaluable additions to the album, and every guest’s performance was exactly what I envisaged. Don’t you just love it when things work? So some of the contributors on ‘Shadow of a Shadow’ are some names you may know, some you may not, but all equally talented. My string band buddies The Wilson Pickers are on there, Brisbane ratbags The Gin Club, Bernard Fanning, Tim Rogers, Clare Bowditch, Washington, and Drew Wooton from the Panics to name a few. The album was mixed in Melbourne by Roger Bergodaz to add some ‘pro’ to my amateur recording, with me barking orders from the studio couch.I believe Shadow of Shadow is a distillation of all my solo work so far – even though it abandons the idea of a concept, by way of virtue I think it is the most cohesive collection of songs I have put together. I’ve always considered myself a late bloomer, so maybe all these years practicing my craft and learning from people, peers and all that goes on around me has paid off. I still hope to make the Australian test cricket team too being a late bloomer and all! Anyway, I hope you enjoy listening to this album, I certainly enjoyed making it.Sincerely,Andrew Morris.

Andrew Morris has completed an epic Euro-rock opus written in Berlin!

This, however, is not it.

Artist
Andy Kelly is known to many as Andy Clockwise.  He is also known to many as the eccentric, charismatic, magnetic, ‘so talented it’s almost unfair’ (The Daily Telegraph) brand new legend of rock and roll.Come from Sydney Australia, he has made his home in Los Angeles for the past two years. Andy stands out with his genre-defying sound; He is part punk, part pop, part country, and part indescribable. He can smile while breaking your heart and make you cry while making you dance. His was a childhood diet of Motown, folk records, and MTV. This along with his insatiable hunger to master the drums, guitar, piano, bass, and every prance and prowl of his heroes stage work in his early adolescence, goes some way in explaining his propensity to buck against the trends of the day to produce timeless pop and rock songs that make you say “I was there!” and stand the test of time.  ‘Andy Clockwise’ emerged after a brief stint at a Sydney university and gigging in and around the Sydney underground music and art scene.  Single-handedly writing, recording and producing his debut EP in 2003, the release Song Exhibition spawned a couple of high rotation singles on Australian national radio, a healthy dose of critical acclaim and a bunch of new fans. His was a touring act at a very young age.  There are few debut long-players that can claim to be as ambitious, as thrilling and as unpredictable as Andy’s 2006 release, Classic FM.  Ostensibly a concept double-album with songs that stand up alone and together, it scored countless 4 and 5-star reviews in Australia, Triple J Feature Album of the Week, sold-out national tours (including a nationally-broadcast live shows) and support slots with INXS and Hugh Cornwall (The Stranglers). But like Andy would say “I hit a ceiling, I needed something different, a change is as good as a holiday, so the minute I could I packed up to move to England or America went on a short tour with an electro punk band and somehow ended up in LA, what a cliché?” Since arriving in Los Angeles something has happened to Andy and to all of us. He spent the first months playing with a lap top and acoustic guitar until local musicians and drunks at bars became his band, ever evolving until it became what it is today; one of the most exciting live shows you have ever seen. It’s the type of show that makes you feel like you are at your first concert again.Part Elvis, part Iggy, but all around mind blowing.   The songs are simultaneously classic yet thoroughly modern.  Radio-friendly but unconventional.  The influences are there, but their marriage is unique:  Bob Dylan with Prince, U2 with Sly & the Family Stone, 70’s glam with 80‘s funk-rock.

Andy Kelly is known to many as Andy Clockwise.  He is also known to many as the eccentric, charismatic, magnetic, ‘so

Artist
Danny’s first musical experience was in the womb. “My parents were living in London and while I was incubating they took me along to hear Crosby Stills and Nash, Neil Young, Bruce Springsteen’s famous 1975 Hammersmith Odeon concert and Led Zeppelin.” His career looked bright until he was struck down by leukaemia when he was 19 he eventually won this battle ten years later and returned to music with his debut album “The Transplant Tapes” written during recovery from the bone marrow transplant that saved his life. Danny’s skills on the guitar lead him to some serious session work including playing lead guitar in the touring bands of Bernard Fanning and Tim Rogers. Since then Danny’ has toured the nation with his band The Wilson Pickers and has been busy writing and recording his latest album. Danny's new album is a story of endurance. Find Someone is an album recorded and put together while leukaemia was spreading inside Danny Widdicombe. Danny was touring through Germany, The Netherlands and the UK, unaware of the cancer silently taking hold – until, at the climax of the tour, he collapsed and was rushed back to Australia to receive immediate treatment at the Royal Brisbane Hospital. He had already made a start on his new album Find Someone in Brisbane before he left, writing and recording mostly demos of new songs, capturing their essence with first-take recordings. In Berlin he wrote and recorded more songs and finally, as the new twist of events dawned on him, he even laid down some overdubs in the lead-lined radiation room in the hospital between bouts of chemotherapy. As Danny’s health deteriorated, and he started to worry that this was to become a posthumous release, his long-time friend Lachlan ‘Magoo’ Goold picked up the reins and steered the album to completion, adding the final touches and his studio wizardry. More of Danny’s friends rallied behind him – some of Australia’s best musicians added their skills, people like Terepai Richmond, James Gillard, Luke Moller, Ben Salter, Andrew Morris, Grant Cummerford and Mel Robinson. Buoyed by the support from his family and friends, and with his new album to focus his mind away from the everyday monotony of life in hospital, Danny managed to slowly regain some strength and return home to his wife and children. But this is only the background story of a great album. Find Someone is full of well-written songs that range from Crazy Horse-style rock, through Berlin-inspired synthesiser groove pop to intimate, thought provoking nylon-string plucked songs that make it obvious why Danny is an award-winning songwriter and instrumentalist.

Danny’s first musical experience was in the womb.

Artist
To label The Audreys as just another roots-folk band would be a tragic mistake.   Taasha Coates should have been a nightclub singer, crooning like Lena Horne before a starstudded crowd at the Cocoanut Grove in 1950s Los Angeles. Tristan Goodall, on the other hand, would probably choose to be reborn as a member of Crazy Horse rocking out Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere in 1969. (I once sent Taasha a Tom Petty compilation, knowing how much she detested Petty’s music. Tristan got the CD stuck in Taasha’s car stereo, where it tortured her for months. Tristan, on theother hand, couldn’t have been happier.)   The Audreys is the common ground where these two extremes collide and, extraordinarily, coalesce. It’s all there on the front cover of their debut record, Between Last Night And Us – the glamorous frock and gloves holding a delicate bird on one side; the crumpled suit and masculine hands offering a bird’s nest on the other. Prophetic symbolism.   To me, The Audreys has always been about the tension and beauty resulting from the union of extremes; the masculine and the feminine; the yin and the yang; the light and the dark; the classic and the modern. That tension is palpable every time the band takes to the stage, where I often get the feeling that Taasha and Tristan each have some wild secret they’re longing to publicly confess. Somehow each tempers the other for a greater cause – the music.   “I’ve gone a little bit country since I met you baby. I used to be so rock ‘n’ roll,” Taasha sings in one of the band’s earliest and most defining hits, ‘Banjo & Violin’. The song traces the genesis of The Audreys to a day in country Victoria back in 2003. Holed up in a winery (where else?) in wild weather, Taasha and Tristan joined a group of bluegrass players huddled around an open fire. As strings were plucked and caressed and harmonies soared, their long-suppressed love of old school country music suddenly seemed no longer anything to be ashamed of. Indeed, it provided a platform on which Taasha and Tristan could truly see eye to eye. “Blame it on the banjo and violin.”   Their musical partnership has endured plenty over the last ten years – countless miles on the road cooped up in vans; hundreds of shows (from tiny dives to the world’s biggest festivals); a series of immeasurably talented band members; crippling writer’s block; relocations between Melbourne and Adelaide; three albums, each of which won an ARIA Award for Best Blues & Roots Album (which has to be some kind of record!)   As if all this were not enough, Taasha and Tristan were once a couple. That their musical relationship has survived – and, indeed, thrived – in the face of their breakup and subsequent individual romances is possibly the ultimate testament to its strength. Presented with the opportunity to go back and journey through The Audreys’ collected recordings, I find it remarkable how fully realised the band’s founding blueprint was from the very beginning. Take ‘You & Steve McQueen’ or ‘Oh Honey’ as shining examples. It’s all there – the banjos and violins, the subtle rumbling rhythms, and the vocal melodies and harmonies floating above all with consummate grace, the romance and tragedy.   The Audreys have remained true to that founding sound over the past ten years and three albums, a sound that has been augmented by a number of invaluable contributors. I don’t think either Tristan or Taasha would deny the significance of the role that Shane O’Mara has played in fostering that sound as producer and engineer of all three records. Which isn’t to say The Audreys’ music has not evolved. Although Taasha announced, “There’s a big change coming,” in the opening lines of the band’s second album, When The Flood Comes, each consecutive album has been an exercise in refinement rather than revolution.   Interestingly, both When The Flood Comes (2008) and Sometimes The Stars (2010) were born from adversity. The former lived up to the “difficult second album” tag, with Tristan and Taasha finding themselves exhausted after touring the first album. It took a jaunt to New York’s infamous Chelsea Hotel to reignite the creative spark and produce the album’s ominous opener ‘Chelsea Blues’. When The Flood Comes simmered with a lyrical and musical eloquence that prompted me to observe at the time, “This is not the frivolous young rootsy pop band that I’m sure many hoped The Audreys would become.”   When it came to facing album number three, Tristan and Taasha found themselves without a band. After touring When The Flood Comes, everyone went their separate ways, unsure if there would even be an Audreys to return to. With Shane O’Mara’s guidance, the duo hand-picked musicians to suit each new composition for Sometimes The Stars. This resulted in easily the band’s most interesting and genre-defying work to date, producing some spectacular surprises like the barrel house blues of ‘Poorhouse’ featuring a tooth rattling piano performance by Paul Grabowsky.   Where to next for The Audreys? You’d have to ask Tristan and Taasha that, and even then you’d probably get a different answer on any given day. You can bet that neither of them expected to enjoy a triumphant ten- year career out of a little Adelaide band that formed over a love of banjos and violins.   - MARTIN JONES MANAGING EDITOR, RHYTHMS MAGAZINE.   http://www.theaudreys.com.au/ https://www.facebook.com/theaudreys?fref=ts https://twitter.com/TheAudreys  

Some of the most unforgettable music ever made has been born from just taking time to live life, to reflect on the pa

Artist
At 15 years old Tom Jordan is already proving that he has an extraordinary career ahead of him as a musician and tv personality. A local of North Curl Curl on Sydney’s northern beaches Tom attends The McDonald College in North Strathfield, Sydney.
As a singer and songwriter Tom first began solo performances busking in Manly when he was 9, from which as a 10 year old he was invited to participate in the 2004 Manly Youth Busking competition. He won the under 13 category. From here he participated in the 2004 National Busking by the Sea competition at Narrabeen Sands Hotel. He went on that year to win the open final against all comers. Following the competition Channel 7 ran a story featuring Tom on their Sydney Weekender program. Local identity on the northern beaches Tom subsequently went on to again win the open division of the 2005 Manly Youth Busking Competition, the 2005 Busking by the Sea Competition and the Brisbane open Busking Festival Final held at Redland Bay in December 2005. As an 11 year old Tom won awards for original composition for his song ‘Back Home’ in the Music & Arts Talent Search Teen Song Writers competition held early 2005. Becoming somewhat of a local identity on the northern beaches because of his amazing talent, Tom is often invited to perform at celebrity parties and charity events including Wendy Harmer’s 50th, Damian Hardman’s 40th and Spinal Cord Injuries Australia Gala Day. During the summer of 05/06 Tom performed as a feature artist at the Manly Carols by Candle Light and was a feature artist at the Manly Citizenship/Australia Day Celebration. Sold out showsIn January 2006 Tom was featured on Mix 106.5FM after Matthew White, Channel 7 and Mix 106.5 Summer breakfast host, saw him play at The Deck in Dee Why. Matt was so amazed by Tom’s performance that he went into work the next day and said they had to get him on as a guest artist and for a live performance. Tom did so and was on air with the breakfast crew for half an hour and performed two original songs. Other notable gigs Tom played in 2006 include performing as pre-match entertainment at the Manly Sea Eagles home game for the opening round of the NRL Competition, in front of a crowd of 17,000, performing at the Rip Curl Pro Music Festival at Bell’s Beach over Easter, performing at Layne Beachley’s annual gala charity event for the Layne Beachley Foundation with INXS, and at various high profile events during the 2006 Australian Fashion Week. In both February and October 2007 Tom was invited to join Guy Sebastian on his national tours and played sold out shows throughout Melbourne, Sydney, Adelaide & Brisbane. In September 2007 Tom also played a series of shows with Diesel at The Vanguard in Sydney. 
 Tom’s talent and success has resulted in feature stories being written on him in Sydney’s Daily Telegraph, Sunday Telegraph, Sydney Morning Herald and Manly Daily, has had a special story done on him on Channel 7’s Today Tonight and has appeared on other tv shows such as Saturday Disney, Cyber Shack and Channel 10 News. Tom’s skills also extend to television presenting and acting … He is a regular presenter/co-host of Channel 7’s Sydney Weekender program, appears as a guest presenter in various Disney Channel shows and just completed his first acting role as one of the stars in Disney Channel’s newest series ‘As The Bell Rings’. Tom not only acted in the series but also co-wrote the songs he will perform as part of the show.

Tom Jordan is a 19 year old Australian singer / songwriter - based in Los Angeles

Artist
  Carmen Warrington began studying meditation in 1984 and soon discovered her gift of helping others experience peace through her heartfelt words and deeply nurturing and soothing voice. She is often referred to as “The Voice of Peace”. She collaborates with her long-time partner David Jones in a variety of uplifting concerts and recordings. Her CDs have helped thousands of people around the world find peace and inner strength.   David Jones is an award-winning and highly-acclaimed drummer-percussionist, admired by musicians and music-lovers around the world. He began studying meditation in 1984, and since then has integrated subtle sounds and vibrations into his music-making. He is a drummer who loves silence and enjoys the universe of percussion instruments, especially his collection of Tibetan, Japanese and crystal singing bowls which feature on his many recordings   Carmen and David live in Melbourne Australia. They are long-term vegetarians and meditators, dedicated to serving humanity through their commitment to peace and higher consciousness. 

Carmen Warrington began studying meditation in 1984 and soon discovered her gift of helping others experience peace t

Artist
Jay Laga'aia is best known for his part on Australian children's TV show Playschool, and also for his role as Captain Typho in the films Star Wars Episode II: Attack of the Clones and Star Wars Episode III: Revenge of the Sith.He played the role of Draco in several episodes of the television series Xena: Warrior Princess. Jay was a regular in Australian television shows Water Rats, Play School, Surprise Surprise, and a contestant on Celebrity Big Brother in 2002 and had a guest role as Gabriel in McLeod's Daughters. He is also known for his stage productions such as The Lion King. Laga'aia played the role of Judas in a 1994 production of Jesus Christ Superstar in New Zealand. In 2007, Laga'aia released a children's album, Come Dance and Sing. Jay currently narrates each of the characters on the children's show Larry the Lawnmower which airs on Channel Seven. In November 2009, it was confirmed that Laga'aia had joined the cast of Australian soap opera Home and Away, as Reverend Elijah Johnson. Jay released his second CD for children, I Can Play Anything, in August 2010 http://www.jaylagaaia.com.au/https://www.facebook.com/jaylagaaiamusichttps://twitter.com/JayLagaaiahttps://instagram.com/jaylagaaia/

Jay Laga’aia is one of Australia’s most recognised faces having starred in an extraordinary number of films, TV progr

Artist
 Elliott BROOD are an explosive live trio out of Toronto Ontario Canada. The band tours regularly throughout the western world and have appeared live with Wilco, Calexico, Blue Rodeo, the Sadies, Sam Roberts, the Black Crowes, Soul Asylum.   The release of their new record, “Mountain Meadows” marks the evolution of Elliott BROOD’s mystique, from a curious backwoods figure to a timeless rogue character. The band continues to employ a Commando recording style, utilizing remote location recordings (town halls, hunting lodge, mountain cabin), this time compiled and embellished at John Critchley’s soon-to-become-legendary “Green Door Studio”. You can seek out elements of the location history in any Elliott BROOD record, and this is no exception. Driving acoustic guitars, ukulele, banjo, piano and their patented stomps combine here to take you on the journey. “Mountain Meadows” is loosely based on real and fictional stories from a roadside wagon train ambush and massacre (of the same name) in Utah in the 1850’s.   “Mountain Meadows” debuted at #2 on the Exclaim Magazine national radio chart (Canada), and stayed in the top 50 chart for 36 weeks. In the US, “Mountain Meadows” debuted in the Americana Music Association radio top 40 chart at #37. “Ambassador” stayed on the Exclaim national radio top 50 chart for 17 weeks.   Elliott BROOD’s music has been used on many tv and movie cues, including the Sundance nominated, “Grown up Movie Star”, and the teen television drama “Kyle XY”. Their song “The Valley Town” was featured on television during the 2010 CBC “Hockey Night in Canada” presentation of the Stanley Cup Playoffs.    Nominations and Awards; Juno Award - “Mountain Meadows” - nomination roots/traditional album 2009 Juno Award - “Mountain Meadows” - nomination cd artwork 2009 Polaris Music Prize -“Mountain Meadows” -shortlist Best Canadian album 2009 Juno Award - “Ambassador” - nomination roots/traditional album 2006 CBC Galaxie Rising Star - winner 2006   Discography: “Mountain Meadows” LP 2008 “Ambassador” LP 2005 “Tin Type” EP 2003   Reviews: “… delivered with exuberance and skill … mightily recommended.” 4 stars –Uncut “a breathtaking amalgam of the Band’s sense of history and My Morning Jacket’s metallic country” 4 Stars -Q magazine   “…superior murder ballads…excellent debut…” 4 stars -Uncut magazine

Elliott Brood

Artist
If superbly-crafted pop-rock and great songwriting is your thing, then look no further than Steve Lane and The Autocrats…Rapidly gathering a reputation as a live act not to be missed, you couldn’t ask for a band with a better music pedigree. It includes frontman Steve Lane (voicepopfoible), a prolific musician and music producer; the “Earl Of Bass” Edmondo Amendola (Augie March); “Gentlemanly Purveyor Of Beats” Dave Williams (Augie March, Dan Kelly); co-conspirator Jimmy Williams (Paul Kelly & The Dots, The Shedshakers) and “Rhythmic Axeman” Pete Slater (Dalriada).Paul Kelly, Wilco and The Church inspire their music; chances are The Autocrats will inspire all who come their way…Steve Lane and The Autocrats are seasoned musicians who deliver honest, heartfelt odes to everyday life, thoroughly wrapped in energetic indie pop-rock with a tinge of roots thrown in for good measure. Presenting their unique take on Australian life in the ‘noughties’, they are musicians who live to play, and love to play live.Musician/producer/engineer, Steve Lane has spent the last couple of years playing Australia-wide with eclectic festival faves, voicepopfoible. He’s also been busy writing and recording in remote communities as far afield as Timor-Leste, Fiji and outback Australia. In 2008, Steve began a creative collaboration with Central Victorian author John Holton, to write songs that reflect the conflicted nature of everyday life, from memory and longing to the “Aha!” moments and lingering melancholy.Keen to kick off his own band in 2009, Steve enlisted the services of some good muso friends and hey presto!, The Autocrats were born… The Autocrats feature Steve’s co-conspirator Jimmy Williams (Paul Kelly & The Dots, The Shedshakers) who gives his all playing soulful guitar and piano; Steve’s longtime buddy, “Rhythmic Axeman” Pete Slater (Dalriada); the distinctive “Earl of Bass” Edmondo Amendola (Augie March) and the refined, gentlemanly “Purveyor of Beats”, drummer Dave Williams (Augie March, Dan Kelly).Along the way The Autocrats have been fortunate to utilise the sublime talents of Ben Gibbons on double bass, Darren Seltmann (The Avalanches) on drums and the gorgeous vocals of Melbourne singer-songwriter, Rachael Kane. 
Artist
I’m Not Singing is a new children’s album from Rhys Muldoon. Co-written by Rhys and Kram (Spiderbait), this is one album that won’t be thrown out the car window and will have children and parents laughing and singing along to the infectious and somewhat irreverent songs. Featuring guest vocals from Tex Perkins, you’ll never look at children’s music the same way again!Rhys Muldoon has filled almost every role there is to fill in the local entertainment and media industry. From starring in films such as Danny Deckchair and The Saviour to his cult status TV roles in The Secret Life Of Us and Play School (the latter, a legendary rite of passage for many of Australia’s finest actors). Add to that an illustrious theatre career, radio broadcasting and a children’s book (penned with contributions from former Prime Minister, Kevin Rudd) thrown in for good measure. Rhys Muldoon continues to generate work that has cemented his position as one of Australia’s leading artistic forces.With I’m Not Singing, Muldoon has added another cheeky and fun string to his creative bow. My suggestion is check your high brow, critical ear at the door, dig up your old whoopee cushion and immerse yourself in a world where kids get to be kids and adults can sing along without having to deal with Jack n’ Jill or that annoying Little Miss Muffett. https://twitter.com/rhysam

Rhys Muldoon’s credits cover wide-ranging experience in film, television, theatre, comedy and radio.

Artist
After five years as founding member, songwriter and vocalist for notorious, seven piece noir punk/garage swing band ‘The Snake Oil Merchants’, a favourite on the Australian festival circuit, Melbourne artist Mojo Juju has made a bold departure from the big band and set out on her own.   Set to breakneck rhythms and hard-¬‐boiled stories from life on the road, Mojo Juju draws inspiration from the Jazz age, early blues and Latin American ‘Pachuco’ culture of the 1930’s and 1940’s.   Described as "Sleazy, jazzy, swingin’, rockin’ sass... and it all sounds so effortless" (Time Off), watch as Mojo Juju unveils a new posse of the slickest, suavest and deadliest guns on instruments yet.   Smooth, shiny & loaded with sin. The kind of music that could make a bishop kick a hole in a stained glass window. Mojo Juju sings songs that sound just like that night you can't quite remember, in that bar you swear you weren't at, with that girl you promise you've never met.    http://www.mojojuju.org/ https://www.facebook.com/mojojujumusic?fref=ts https://twitter.com/MojoJujuMusic https://instagram.com/mojojujumusic/

Mojo Juju sings songs that sound like that night you can't quite remember and that girl you promise you've never met.

Artist
 “I’ve never done this for instant gratification. I’ve done this because I love music.” Sometimes an artist is defined less by what she does than what she chooses not to do. If there’s a career philosophy in this period of multi-platform media and all-publicity-is-good-publicity cross-promotion, it’s that an artist – especially a new one – needs to be everywhere all the time. The big break could come from anywhere. After all, what if the thing you turn down turns out to be the thing that would have transformed you into a star? So what does one make of 21 year old Sinead Burgess, who had an entire album ready for release when she decided that it wasn’t representative enough? What sort of young artist gets selected for a high-profile television show, and then turns it down in favour of sweaty gigs and road hours? An artist with an unusually sophisticated sense of who she is, that’s what. Maybe that resilience comes from a childhood spent on the Queensland coast, far from the big city lights. “I grew up in Beachmere, a blink-and-you’ll-miss-town town on the outskirts of Caboolture,” she explains. “It’s a really sleepy little town, not a lot of people there – I went to a 300 population primary school, then to a 1500 population high school – and that was a huge change for me. I thought that was so big, and now I’m in Sydney!” Her parents recognised her musical talents early. “I had a little musical telephone that I liked to play on. I started making songs and my parents went ‘oh, OK, that’s interesting, we should buy her a little keyboard’. So eventually that little keyboard moved up to a big one, and that eventually moved up to the old upright piano. I was just glued to it from a very young age, always singing, always writing songs.” She’s not kidding about the songwriting either. “My first documented song was when I was five. It went ‘Mum loves dad, ooh-ooh-ooh / Dad loves mum too-ooh-ooh / You like my song, don’t you?’” she laughs. “I wrote it in a little book in crayon and I have it framed beside my piano. It’s a good thing for me to look at, just to go ‘OK, the five-year-old you loved writing songs, don’t ever forget that.’” Music was always around the young Sinead. “As a kid I was really lucky. I had my parent’s influence heavily ingrained, because they always had the radio on, or their albums – Beatles to Clapton to Hendrix to ELO to the Hollies. Elton John was a big one.” But there were even bigger influences to come… “Celine Dion,” she laughs. “When I was about eight I would stand in the loungeroom with a remote control microphone and belt out ‘My Heart Will Go On’. And an eight year old doesn’t really have the chops to do that. But I tried really hard! And then I went through a Spice Girls phase; I was Posh Spice, because she was the only one with brown hair – but I used to sing all of Sporty’s parts, because she was the lead singer. I have some incriminating videos of that. I think I’ll burn them next I get up home.” However, the next phase of her musical life was about as far from zigga-zig-ha as possible – and was to have enormous consequences for the precocious thirteen year old. “There was a music festival in Caboolture and my mum said ‘hey, you love to sing, and here’s a chance to play with a band – I’ll put you in for the talent quest, if you like; if not, all good’. It was a chance to perform so I decided to go into it.” The effect was electric. “I remember all of a sudden feeling that band, the sound just hits you in the back. Up until that point I’d be playing by myself, and I actually missed the entry to the song because I was so overwhelmed by the wall of sound behind me. And from there on I was addicted.” It didn’t take long for her to expand her musical horizons further. “I was fifteen and I saw my brothers guitar sitting in a corner – it was one of those birthday presents where he played it three times and then got bored – and I remember thinking ‘I would LOVE to be able to play that’. And when I picked it up, I literally couldn’t put it down. It just felt so right.” Sinead became a fixture on the fertile Queensland country circuit, despite being too young to legally hang around most of the places she was playing. ABC music signed her as a country artist, but it didn’t take long for Sinead’s ambitions to outgrow the constraints of the genre. “I did my first trip to Nashville when I was just freshly 18 and it was ‘OK, we’re going to write for a country record’. So I wrote a whole bunch of songs with people who’d written songs I was playing in my sets at the time – amazing, legitimate songwriters – and I came back with all these songs that were great, but they just weren’t resonating with me. “I remember playing them to my mum on the piano and saying ‘this isn’t me, this is really scaring me: I’m going to make this record, my first introduction to the world, and it’s not me.’ So we decided I was going to go to the label and say ‘I want to make a rock-pop record, how do you feel about that?’ And luckily they were receptive and they said ‘alright, we’ll put you with some writers and see how you go.’” That’s pretty ballsy for an unknown 18 year old artist, but her convictions paid off when she was paired up with UK pop wunderkind Stuart Crichton – who has worked with the likes of Kylie, Pet Shop Boys, Bond and The Sugababes. If Burgess was daunted, she made the pressure work for her. “I knew he had some really big pop and dance hits in the UK. I remember walking in and thinking ‘OK, if I want to make the record I want to make, this session has to work’. So we sat down and started talking and jamming on chords, and all of a sudden I was excited again. There was that feeling I had when I was a kid when I first picked up a guitar, when I was writing those songs, going ‘yes! This is making me excited!’ It just reiterated the fact that this is what I need to be doing.” Her sessions with Crichton lead to a joint venture with Universal and produced her debut single, ‘Goodnight America’, along with the conviction that she’d found her own voice. Which explains why she turned down a career-launching berth on a certain massive televised talent show, despite the fact that she was eking out a living packing boxes at a warehouse at the time. “There are always hard decisions,” she shrugs. “And it’s always hard to go with your gut, because generally your gut’s telling you not to do something that could be awesome. But I’d already done so much of the developing and songwriting and shitkicker late-shift gigs and terrible hotels. I’ve given myself that time to develop so that when I say something, I want to be able to really mean it.” And now we have Sinead Burgess, poised to be an overnight success after almost a decade of blood, sweat and hard work. “My strongest feeling through all that was to give myself that time to develop so that when I say something, I want to really mean it and want to have lived it,” she concludes, “And I think that’s the good thing about this single too: I went away and lived in the States for a while and fell in love and fell out of love, found my heart and got it broken, and that whole experience it all added to what I have to say as an artist. “Rather than try to sing other people’s songs and try to mean it, I can sing my own.” 
“I’ve never done this for instant gratification.
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“I firmly believe Ben Salter to be one of the world's great singers, and if I weren't so goddamn competitive, one of its great songwriters."Tim Rogers 2011 was a big year for Ben Salter. His debut album The Cat was released to glowing reviews including four stars in Rolling Stone and a 9/10 in J Mag, who said: “Ben Salter has assembled a true masterpiece with these twelve tracks.. (they) display an amazing grasp of musical and lyrical wrangling. ...There’s an abundance of gems..  Cheery, teary and damn impressive.” - J Mag - 9/10 Produced by the Drones’ Gareth Liddiard, The Cat was a clean break from Salter’s previous work in acts such as Giants of Science, The Gin Club and The Wilson Pickers. A blend of avant-garde pop, folk and rock, it was at once conventional but also delightfully skewed.  Salter toured the country several times in support of the album as well as supporting Cat Power, Paul Dempsey, J. Mascis and many others. He was awarded the “Most Popular Artist” and “Album Of The Year” at the Queensland Music Awards; performed a duet with Kimbra on SBS's Rockwiz program; and relocated to Melbourne for six months, playing every residency and bar show he could manage to fit into an already busy schedule. Then in early 2012 Salter was awarded a New Work Grant from the Australia Council, his stated project to spend five months in Europe collaborating with as many songwriters and artists as possible. Although he started with the modest aim of ten or so collaborations and perhaps an album's worth of material, Salter ended up writing nearly forty new compositions with twenty five different collaborators across England, Ireland, Iceland, Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Germany, Italy, Spain and France. He also had a few adventures along the way - climbing a mountain in remote northern Iceland; spending a week travelling through France playing tambourine for Brisbane-based rock band HITS; performing at the Australian High Commission in London during the Jubilee celebrations; playing at an all-night dance party on Italy's Adriatic coast; and getting a guided tour of Madrid’s night life by old friend Bernard Fanning. Salter has not stopped. He has criss-crossed the country several times - supporting Something For Kate, undertaking his own co-headlining tour with Mike Noga, and more recently completing his own "House Music" tour, performing in sheds, loungerooms, verandahs and back yards from Rockhampton to Fremantle. He's also taking part in this year's DARK MOFO festival in Hobart as part of the Vandemonian Lags project, a collaboration with Mick Thomas, Darren Hanlon, Tim Rogers and others for which he has written a number of songs. But in between all this activity he has been racking up hours at Nowhere Audio, a small studio in Brisbane's West End, embellishing and polishing the tracks he recorded on a rudimentary portable studio whilst on his travels. The European Vacation EP is the first fruit of these endeavours. As sonically and thematically varied as its inception suggests; the European Vacation EP flits between genres as steadily as Salter moved from country to country on his travels. There's the atmospheric, harmony drenched pop weirdness of first single “Semi-Pro Gamer”, written and recorded in Berlin with an expatriate Australian physicist, Tom Oates; the ambient electro duet “Tremulous”, recorded in London with German/Australian chanteuse Christa Vi; “The Prophetess”, a paranoid psychedelic rock epic about a 10th Century Icelandic witch (written of course in Reykjavik); and one of the dark fingerstyle folk tunes that Salter has become renowned for in the plaintive “Not Today”, recorded in a Paris apartment after a long night out, and featuring a stunning saxophone solo courtesy of philosophy student Pierre Thevenin, whom Salter met through a mutual friend. That’s not to mention the slow burning indie rock tune “Dark Forces”, co-written with Gin Club bandmate Ola Karlsson in Stockholm; the instrumental “All The Things”, which was conceived entirely in a friend's flat in Dublin; and the eight minute sound-art meditation of “Lecce” which captures the beautiful scorched desolation of the southern Italian town where it was recorded. So the theme of the EP is the journey itself – roaming unexplored territory looking for inspiration and finding it in some unexpected places. Salter toured around Australia in support of his first release through his newly-signed deal with ABC Music, the European Vacation EP.Discography: The Cat (2011)European Vacation EP (2013)http://www.bensalter.com.au/https://www.facebook.com/bensaltermusichttps://twitter.com/SltyDg 

Best known as a founding member of The Gin Club, Giants of Science and The Wilson Pickers, Brisbane, Australia-based

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Little Bastard: a mighty 7 piece punk-string band incorporating guitars, bass, fiddle, banjo, harmonica, mandolin, beats, a load of voices and memorable tunes that’ll suck you into their good time, old time jangle.Indiscriminately jumping on raised platforms with reckless abandon since 2012 Little Bastard have rapidly become one of Australia’s most entertaining and undeniable live acts.“Nearly all members lend a hand at singing yet, when they’re not, they dance and laugh and just have a f@#$%ing good time doing what they do.” – The Music / InpressHaving recently toured nationally with Joe Pug (USA), The Snowdroppers, The Bears and playing festivals such as Peat’s Ridge, Secret Garden, Boogie, Gum Ball and Cherry Rock its safe to say they are already a road-hardened live act. https://www.facebook.com/LittleBastardos?ref=ts&fref=tshttps://twitter.com/LittleBastardoshttps://instagram.com/littlebastardos/
After spending two years cutting their teet
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Drew McAlister has long been recognised as one of the nation’s premier songwriters and performers. The former McAlister Kemp mainstay has penned hundreds of tunes, both with and for artists from Graeme Connors to Luke O’Shea to Tamara Stewart. He’s worked with U.S. songwriting royalty including Brett Jones (Jason Aldean), Brian Maher (Taylor Swift), and Dylan Altman (Tim McGraw), and performed alongside the cream of Aussie country talent: Beccy Cole, Sara Storer, Adam Brand, and countless others.With second solo outing Black Sky, the versatile star shows off his trademark earthy, anthemic style as never before.Recorded in Nashville with the cream of Music City’s mythic session players, Black Sky is a landmark release from the tireless husband and father of two, encompassing co-writes with longtime creative foil Alan Caswell, along with Kaylens Rain’s Glen Harrison, and Caitlyn Shadbolt.Drew McAlister’s sound is best described, as the singer himself puts it, as ‘organic country rock’: music that moves us both to celebrate life’s greatest joys, and to reflect upon the challenges that confront us all. Black Sky showcases eleven soaring anthems of resilience and love, anchored throughout by McAlister’s incisive reflections on the lessons that bind us together as a people.“It had to tick two boxes,” McAlister says of the album’s driving purpose. “It had to have an energy about it, but it still had to have that songwriter element to it, as well. I still wanted to tell a story – that’s the thing I’ve always loved about country music: the story element. There’s still that message in the songs here, but I also wanted them to translate live.”After winning the Gympie Muster’s prestigious Maton Talent Search in 2003, McAlister netted his first Golden Guitar in 2007, taking home the Vocal Collaboration of the Year Award for ‘A Little Bit of Country in Us All’ with Alan Caswell. He’s since collected Golden Guitars for Song Of The Year and Heritage Song of the Year (for Luke O’Shea co-write ‘Lady of the Land’), and garnered scores of APRA, TIARA, and Victorian National Country Music Awards wins and nominations.Ramping up the intensity of careworn solo debut There to Here (2008), Black Sky builds on an enviable creative bedrock.McAlister Kemp’s three-album run firmly established McAlister as one of Australian country music’s enduring greats. All Kinds of Tough (2010), Country Proud (2012), and Harder to Tame (2014) stormed the ARIA Country and Mainstream Albums Charts, spawning irrepressible radio favourites such as “It Don’t Buy You Love”, “Something to Build On”, and anti-bullying anthem “Fight Me”, along with a slew of Number 1 hits including “All Kinds of Tough”, “Hell Yeah”, and “Hard Work”. Along the way, MK picked up a Golden Guitar for Best New Talent, took out the 2011 CMC Music Award for Best New Oz Artist, performed at Nashville’s CMA Fest, opened for the legendary Alan Jackson on the megastar’s sold-out 2011 Australian tour, and joined country music giants Big & Rich on the road in the U.S.“With Black Sky, I said right from the beginning that I wasn’t going to stray too far from McAlister Kemp,” McAlister says. “Because I wrote a lot of those songs, and I love them – they’re a part of me. You’ve got to have those songs that people feel like they’ve lived.”Lead single “Black Sky” thunders like the elusive stormclouds longed for by its everyday heroes.‘Sweat drippin’ from a young man’s brow, he’s workin’ hard and he’s workin’ it out. Keeps an eye on the sky above, but it never comes.’“I wanted to go back to my roots with the first single,” McAlister explains. “Both of my parents came from properties outside Garah, which is just outside of Moree – so my history is from the land. I still remember stories that mum and dad told me about growing up on the land, and also about the tough times with the drought.”The infectious “In a Band” honours those aspects of a musician’s life that fuel McAlister’s creative fire.“The one true thing, the one really real, organic and honest thing about music is, first, the creation of it, and then the actual performing of it,” McAlister says. “That hour-and-fifteen-minutes on stage is still like nothing else you can ever do. ‘In a Band’ captures a bit of that journey.”Soul-steeped anthem “Storm Front” harnesses organ, chiming keys and tearing guitars, serving as a timely reminder that the most important of life’s labours is the protection of those things we hold most dear – whatever the cost.A nod to festival favourites such as Dierks Bentley and Zac Brown Band, “Til Summer Slips Away” is another anthem: this time to long summer days and balmy nights filled with cold beer and easy living.Driving country rock statement “Bills” is the first of several tracks to consider both the pressures and simple joys of family life. It’s a theme reprised by the intensely personal “Miracle on the Way”.“‘Miracle on the Way’ is about my wife and I having our first daughter, Jessica,” McAlister explains. “Both of my girls were IVF, and with Jess it was like, man, we don’t care if it’s a boy or if it’s a girl, we’re just happy to have a baby! And it literally was a miracle.”At once delicate and powerful, “Last Night on Earth” introduces stirring strings to the mix, while the sensuous, radio-ready “You Get Me” gives thanks for the constancy, love and support of a tireless life companion.There’s driving country rock in barroom stomp “More To It”, and a cautionary tale of youthful rebellion and escape gone wrong in the electrifying “Clyde”.Black Sky is Drew McAlister at his rousing, honest best – a rare album of both formidable pedigree and boundless immediacy and heart. Above all, Black Sky is an album overflowing with stories of us.

ABC Music Publishing has signed Drew McAlister, acclaimed country music songwriter and as part of duo McAlister Kemp,

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As the frontman of You Am I, one of the essential Australian rock n’ roll bands, Tim Rogers has released 10 studio
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After over a decade of experience as guitarist to one of Australia's much-loved rock groups You Am I, Davey Lane is
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“I’ve been drinking coffee since I was eight years old”, says Lachlan Bryan.
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When Mike Carr accepted his award for the APRA Song of the Year in January 2006,it was the beginning of wonderful r
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Kate Jacobson and Benjamin Dougherty (Texas Tea)
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Daz Gray
 
Darryl Gray has been writing songs ever since he was forced to learn guitar at schoo
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Jaime’s  approach    to    music    making    is    always    changing.    More    of    an    ideas    man    than  

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The latest offering from Toronto-based singer-songwriter Matthew Barber is a self-titled and self-produced collection

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Richard was previously the singer and songwriter for the Sydney indie band Cuthbert and the Night Walkers.

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In a cramped studio deep in Bushwick, New York City, You Am I hunkered down to make a start on their tenth studio alb

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Ruby Boots (Bex Chilcott) lives and breathes her music.

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Authenticity is the element that defines the darkly beautiful and wrenching debut record of William Crighton.

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With a career spanning just 9 years, 8 releases under his belt, named in Melbourne Magazine’s 100 most influential people, and nominated for Melbourne International Comedy Festival’s ‘Barry Award’, Jordie Lane is widely regarded as one of Australia’s finest singer-songwriters. 

With a career spanning just 9 years, 8 releases under his

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Singer/songwriter Taasha Coates is better known as the voice of multi ARIA Award winning folk-rock darlings The Audreys.However with The Audreys currently on temporary hiatus, Taasha has released her very first solo album titled – Taasha Coates & Her Melancholy SweetheartsRecorded with fellow singer-songwriter and producer Shane Nicholson, the well loved front woman has found a new voice through her solo material. More personal and direct and flirting more obviously with alt-country, the songs swing between the saucy and the sad, all the while held down by that truly terrific voice.

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Raised in Tamworth, imbued from a young age with country music, before moving off to Sydney and immersing himself in the city’s gritty punk scene, McHugh now calls Brisbane home, he and his family ensconced within the hot damp that defines the Queensland capital, home to a slew of primal, passionate music over the years.Adding to this cannon, in writing for his second record City Bound Trains, McHugh has come full circle and now calls country home once more. But it’s intelligent country, poignant and vivid. McHugh comes from the Paul Kelly school of song writing in that simplicity is key and everyday life makes the best stories.“I know there are many reasons why people listen to and enjoy music… but for me, the style of music that I wanted to make, honesty was paramount,” he explains. “It had to be about something that I knew about, or cared about.”It’s a simple thing, and yet in McHugh’s hands, it’s powerfully raw and real.These stories are then set to a musical score that both throbs with a visceral power, and gently pulsates with a calmness and tranquillity. From the almost anthemic nature of ‘Down To Sydney’, with its electric build, to the gentle rocking of ‘Rita’, McHugh pulls it all together with a quiet aplomb.City Bound Trains, which follows on from 2013’s Trials & Cape Tribulation and is produced by Brendan Gallagher (Karma County), is a neat and strong package that showcases this growing songwriter’s talent to a tee.Honesty at its core, everyday life its muse, Paddy McHugh is a master of it all.